Book Club Update

Hi guys, after much deliberation I’ve chosen to read three books suggested to me by the book club I joined last Wednesday. Each book is set in a different time period and attacks different struggles. All links will take you to the Waterstones website which is a UK based bookselling site. You can also purchase these on Amazon and other affiliated sites. They’re also available on Goodreads which will provide you with a little link below telling you where you can purchase each copy.

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These books are as follows:

  1. Little Deaths by Emma Flint

    It’s 1965 in a tight-knit working-class neighborhood in Queens, New York, and Ruth Malone–a single mother who works long hours as a cocktail waitress–wakes to discover her two small children, Frankie Jr. and Cindy, have gone missing. Later that day, Cindy’s body is found in a derelict lot a half mile from her home, strangled. Ten days later, Frankie Jr.’s decomposing body is found. Immediately, all fingers point to Ruth.

    As police investigate the murders, the detritus of Ruth’s life is exposed. Seen through the eyes of the cops, the empty bourbon bottles and provocative clothing which litter her apartment, the piles of letters from countless men and Ruth’s little black book of phone numbers, make her a drunk, a loose woman–and therefore a bad mother. The lead detective, a strict Catholic who believes women belong in the home, leaps to the obvious conclusion: facing divorce and a custody battle, Malone took her children’s lives.

    Pete Wonicke is a rookie tabloid reporter who finagles an assignment to cover the murders. Determined to make his name in the paper, he begins digging into the case. Pete’s interest in the story develops into an obsession with Ruth, and he comes to believe there’s something more to the woman whom prosecutors, the press, and the public have painted as a promiscuous femme fatale. Did Ruth Malone violently kill her own children, is she a victim of circumstance–or is there something more sinister at play?

    Inspired by a true story, Little Deaths, like celebrated novels by Sarah Waters and Megan Abbott, is compelling literary crime fiction that explores the capacity for good and evil in us all.

  2. The Gustav Sonata by Rose Tremain

    The Sunday Times Top Ten Bestseller
    Shortlisted for the Costa Novel Award

    What is the difference between friendship and love?

    Gustav grows up in a small town in Switzerland, where the horrors of the Second World War seem a distant echo. But Gustav’s father has mysteriously died, and his adored mother Emilie is strangely cold and indifferent to him. Gustav’s life is a lonely one until he meets Anton. An intense lifelong friendship develops but Anton fails to understand how deeply and irrevocably his life and Gustav’s are entwined until it is almost too late…

    ‘This is a perfect novel’ Observer

    ‘The Gustav Sonata is beautifully rendered, and magnificent in its scope. It glows with mastery’ Ian McEwan

  3. Shtum by Jem Lester

    Powerful, darkly funny and heart-breaking, Shtum is a story about fathers and sons, autism, and dysfunctional relationships.

    Ben Jewell has hit breaking point. His ten-year-old son Jonah has severe autism and Ben and his wife, Emma, are struggling to cope.

    When Ben and Emma fake a separation – a strategic decision to further Jonah’s case in an upcoming tribunal – Ben and Jonah move in with Georg, Ben’s elderly father. In a small house in North London, three generations of men – one who can’t talk; two who won’t – are thrown together.

    A powerful, emotional, but above all enjoyable read, perfect for fans of THE SHOCK OF THE FALL and THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME.

My next book club meeting is on March 22nd and I’m just hoping I can get them all read in time, especially considering I’m only two out of 3 books read for my previous post ‘Romance Week on Goodreads‘ plus a mountain of reviews I need to complete for NetGalley as well.

Check these books out please. They’re all amazing.

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